Blastocyst culturing is a technique to grow embryos beyond the third day of culture. Typically, we transfer embryos into the uterus about three days after the egg retrieval, which is several days earlier than would occur in nature. On the third day, embryos generally are between six to eight cells. We now have the ability to keep the embryos two additional days in a culturing material before implanting in the uterus. During this additional culture period, the embryos continue to grow to become "blastocysts."
A 2018 study published by JAMA Internal Medicine conducted a diet assessment analysis of 325 women who received fertility treatments. This diet assessment analyzed the concentrated amount of pesticide found on the fruits and vegetables the women ingested. The main outcome from this study highlighted that the women who received fertility treatments and ingested fruits and vegetables with higher concentrations of pesticides were 18 percent less likely to have successful clinical pregnancies and 26 less likely to have live births. (13)
Improper function of the hypothalamus or pituitary glands. The hypothalamus and pituitary glands in the brain produce hormones that maintain normal testicular function. Production of too much prolactin, a hormone made by the pituitary gland (often due to the presence of a benign pituitary gland tumor), or other conditions that damage or impair the function of the hypothalamus or the pituitary gland may result in low or no sperm production.

In general, infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant (conceive) after one year (or longer) of unprotected sex. Because fertility in women is known to decline steadily with age, some providers evaluate and treat women aged 35 years or older after 6 months of unprotected sex. Women with infertility should consider making an appointment with a reproductive endocrinologist—a doctor who specializes in managing infertility. Reproductive endocrinologists may also be able to help women with recurrent pregnancy loss, defined as having two or more spontaneous miscarriages.


In general, infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant (conceive) after one year (or longer) of unprotected sex. Because fertility in women is known to decline steadily with age, some providers evaluate and treat women aged 35 years or older after 6 months of unprotected sex. Women with infertility should consider making an appointment with a reproductive endocrinologist—a doctor who specializes in managing infertility. Reproductive endocrinologists may also be able to help women with recurrent pregnancy loss, defined as having two or more spontaneous miscarriages.
Depending on your age or your fertility history, it may be time to consider female infertility treatment. Your fertility specialist or reproductive endocrinologist is educated in the latest research and patient care for female infertility treatment. The doctor can explain all the options available – from baby-boosting fertility pills or hormones to artificial insemination to high-tech assisted reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization.
Irregular or abnormal ovulation in a woman is responsible for about 25 percent of all female infertility problems. In roughly 40 percent of infertile couples, the male is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of the couple’s infertility. (14) A man may not be producing enough sperm, or the sperm make may be too slow or oddly shaped. Thus, it can be a problem of quantity or quality, or both.

Fennel is another perfect answer to your infertility. We are familiar with benefits of fennel seeds in treating some health issues thanks to containing antioxidants and phytonutrients. It is good at improving digestive system, treating respiratory problems, controlling diabetes, etc. Its effectiveness in treating infertility has been approved in scientific field. It has been shown that it is its estrogenic power that encourages fertility as well as prevents the risk of miscarriage.
When you are born, your ovaries contain hundreds of thousands of immature eggs. Your ovaries house these eggs in tiny follicles. When these eggs are released, you have a chance of becoming pregnant. Ovulation disorders, ovarian cysts and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can affect this process and prevent pregnancy. Fertility drugs, surgeries, and other fertility treatments may help. But what if these treatments fail? Women with abnormal ovulation may be able to get pregnant one day with help from an artificial ovary. This artificial ovary will house tiny eggs, taking them from the early follicular stage to maturity, helping women conceive.
In vitro fertilization (IVF) means fertilization outside of the body. IVF is the most effective ART. It is often used when a woman's fallopian tubes are blocked or when a man produces too few sperm. Doctors treat the woman with a drug that causes the ovaries to produce multiple eggs. Once mature, the eggs are removed from the woman. They are put in a dish in the lab along with the man's sperm for fertilization. After 3 to 5 days, healthy embryos are implanted in the woman's uterus.

Men in some countries may find another wife when their first cannot produce a child, hoping that by sleeping with more women he will be able to produce his own child.[63][65][66] This can be prevalent in some societies, including Cameroon,[63][66] Nigeria,[63] Mozambique,[67] Egypt,[65] Botswana,[69] and Bangladesh,[66] among many more where polygamy is more common and more socially acceptable.

Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROS-kuh-pee): A minor surgery to see inside the abdomen. The doctor does this with a small tool with a light called a laparoscope (LAP-uh-roh-skohp). She or he makes a small cut in the lower abdomen and inserts the laparoscope. With the laparoscope, the doctor can check the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and uterus for disease and physical problems. Doctors can usually find scarring and endometriosis by laparoscopy.
If a Rh-negative woman conceives a Rh-positive baby, she is exposed to Rh protein, which is a blood group protein present on the surface of your cells. The first baby is delivered normally. For the next Rh positive baby, the mother has antibodies which destroy the baby at an early stage. However, this is debatable whether it is an infertility issue any longer. It is secondary infertility only when the woman is unaware of it. Otherwise, the female is fertile.
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