Female infertility varies widely by geographic location around the world. In 2010, there was an estimated 48.5 million infertile couples worldwide, and from 1990 to 2010 there was little change in levels of infertility in most of the world.[2] In 2010, the countries with the lowest rates of female infertility included the South American countries of Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia, as well as in Poland, Kenya, and Republic of Korea.[2] The highest rate regions included Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Oceania, and Sub-Saharan Africa.[2] The prevalence of primary infertility has increased since 1990, but secondary infertility has decreased overall. Rates decreased (although not prevalence) of female infertility in high-income, Central/Eastern Europe, and Central Asia regions.[2]
Foods rich in folate: Folate or folic acid is a B vitamin that helps the body build new cells and prevents birth defects. Experts recommend increasing folate intake before getting pregnant to ensure a healthy pregnancy. Most women are encouraged to take a prenatal vitamin with folic acid to ensure that they get the recommended 400 to 800 micrograms daily. Foods naturally rich in folate include green leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, beans and wheat germ.

Cinnamon is also listed as one of the best home remedies for female infertility problems. Cinnamon is effective in keeping your ovarian function properly. Therefore, it is good at combating against infertility. In addition, it is an excellent solution to polycystic ovarian syndrome which causes you to be infertile. This ingredient is also a good answer to some health issues causing a woman to be unable to have a baby, namely uterine fibroids.
Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include IBM Watson Micromedex (updated 8 Nov 2019), Cerner Multum™ (updated 6 Nov 2019), Wolters Kluwer™ (updated 4 Nov 2019) and others.
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