Numerous health problems could contribute to female infertility. These health problems include; endometriosis, clotting disorders, diabetes, candida, birth defects that affect the reproductive tract, uterine fibroids, anemia, pelvic infection resulting in scarring, pelvic inflammatory disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), thyroid problems, scarring from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and blocked fallopian tubes.
If you’re a woman, you either already have or almost undoubtedly will hear the tick of your biological clock at some point in your life calling you to become a mother. What if that tick goes unanswered? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), millions of women in America suffer from infertility, with some 7.5 million between the ages of 15 and 44 having difficulty getting pregnant or staying pregnant. (1)
Some people can immediately feel the difference in their hormones (even though they may not know this is what it is) when they engage in exercise. The mood improves, they sleep better and they may even experience an increase in their sexual appetite. All of these changes occur with changes in hormones. For example, we often hear about the “feel good hormone” serotonin increasing with exercise.
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